MacNN reported on January 28th that Apple’s Cupertino headquarters held a town hall-style meeting with CEO Steve Jobs at the helm. Occurring a day after Apple’s splashy iPad media event, the meeting was designed for (very brave) employees to ask Jobs questions about the new device.

An anonymous Apple employee in attendance reported the following, allegedly straight from Jobs’ mouth. (Apple employees, even on the retail level, sign strict confidentiality agreements upon hire. If this person’s identity is ever uncovered, they can kiss their job goodbye.) Read on:

On Google:

We did not enter the search business, Jobs said. They entered the phone business. Make no mistake they want to kill the iPhone. We won’t let them, he says. Someone else asks something on a different topic, but there’s no getting Jobs off this rant. I want to go back to that other question first and say one more thing, he says. This don’t be evil mantra: “It’s bullshit.” Audience roars.

On Adobe and Flash:

They are lazy, Jobs says. They have all this potential to do interesting things but they just refuse to do it. They don’t do anything with the approaches that Apple is taking, like Carbon. Apple does not support Flash because it is so buggy, he says. Whenever a Mac crashes more often than not it’s because of Flash. No one will be using Flash, he says. The world is moving to HTML5.

Other interesting tidbits/rumors from the meeting, as reported by Gizmodo:

  • Upcoming iPhone updates will outpace Google at an unmatchable rate.
  • iPad joins Macintosh and iPhone as the triumvirate of most important products Jobs has developed.
  • Apple purchased Lala to join iTunes.
  • Next generation iPhone will be huge.
  • 2010 Macintosh update will take personal computing to a place its never been.
  • Blu-Ray software is messy, and sales are not high enough for Apple to add the feature.

Our take:

Google isn’t kidding around, but Apple has over 20 years experience in the hardware/software game. Until a smartphone becomes as intuitive and easy to use as iPhone, we don’t see Android becoming more popular.

We are firmly on the HTML5 bandwagon, and cannot wait until the day comes that Adobe’s bloated Flash will stop crashing Safari.

2010 is shaping up to be an important year for Apple, Inc. Don’t you wish you bought stock 10 years ago?