I’m pretty disheartened about having to write this post. A couple of weeks ago, we pretty much broke a story to the internet about a couple from NYC. The guy proposed to his girlfriend, while having his friends capture all the excitement on iOS devices.

Some people cried, others wept, and then there was the “FAKE” crowd. Having faith in humanity, we ran the story, and then the next thing we knew, we were being cited all over the internet (including Macbreak Weekly). It was a big day, and we were rewarded with a lot of traffic. Turns out we should have listened to the “FAKE” crowd.

Now, I feel like the kid in the corner wearing a dunce cap, because some jackass thought it would be funny to suck all the romantic mac geeks out there in with a bit of tomfoolery. Yeah, I said jackass, and I mean it. According to Mashable, Thinkmodo created the video for “fun.”  Thinkmodo’s “goal” is to “mine the marketing potential of viral videos.”

So, just so we can set the story straight, we’re offering up this post: The video was fake. We apologize.

We’re not going to link to the video again, but if you’re interested, you can see the original story here.

If you’re thinking about creating a dishonest viral video, you better think twice. A lot of people are pretty pissed today.  Our tipper Laura emailed us this quote yesterday: “FML. I cried when I first saw it.”  Something tells us she wasn’t alone.

Update: We’ve gotten a lot of emails questioning our use of the word “scam” in the title. We’re sticking by it. Here’s the definition (I’ve bolded the important part):

scam |skam|noun informal:

a dishonest scheme; a fraud : [with adj. ] an insurance scam.verb ( scammed , scamming ) [ trans. ]swindle : a guy that scams the elderly out of their savings.

DERIVATIVESscammer noun

Article Via Mashable

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