Today, Spotify announced that they will soon be offering apps within their player. In other words, they are preparing to become a music platform, something that can be integrated into music apps that we know and love already. What’s on board already? So far, the list includes Last.fmWe Are HuntedRolling StoneThe Guardian, and Pitchfork (once you’ve downloaded the beta, click the links). To understand the possibilities, Spotify gave us an analogy:

Let’s say you’re listening to a new track and you’d like to know the lyrics. Just click over to the TuneWiki app and see all the words of the song perfectly synced as you’re listening.

Maybe you want to see a gig this weekend? Check out the Songkick app to find out if any of the artists in your library are performing near you. Then get your hands on tickets with a few clicks.

The apps you’ll discover over the next few days are only the beginning. We’ll surprise you, and probably be surprised ourselves, with many more new and wonderful experiences that will make Spotify even better.

Since launching in the U.S. the company now reports 15 million songs and 10 million active users in 12 countries, 2.5 million of whom pay for a premium ($5 and $10), advertisement-free version. In other words, they are getting around.

How to try it out

Of course this is what you’re really interested in, isn’t it? Well, it’s quite simple actually. No hacking, illegal activity, or going around and around. Rather, it’s a link from Spotify itself. Of course, before you proceed, bear in mind that this is a beta. That means there might be a bug or two – nothing serious.

With that said, head over to Spotify’s download page, find your platform’s link (Mac, Windows, or surprisingly BlackBerry) and click it. Make sure you close the app first and that should be it. Want to learn more about the current apps that are supported? Visit Spotify’s detailed page. Spotify is definitely taking a step in the right direction – implementing its product into everything music.