According to iTot Apps, the Windows Phone 7 version of their iTot apps are being outsold at a rate of 10 to 1 by the iPad version of the app. According to TechCrunch, the company “is a little surprised that the app only sells 1/10th the number of installs on [Windows 7]…Toddler Flashcards is currently ranked #709 for all WP7 apps, and #21 in the paid entertainment category.” It’s probably pretty obvious that the sales numbers are proportional to differentials in iPhone and Windows 7 phones on the market. Any inference outside of that is absurd. But, despite acknowledging that there are differences in phones in the market, Hadi Partovi, cofounder of iTot Apps, is still pretty surprised by the differences in sales.

It’s obvious that kids “lover” the iPad and iPhone. Any time I take mine out around children, a war breaks out between them and I for dominance of the screen. Poke, poke, poke, touch, touch, touch, and then, when it’s time to put the device away, it becomes a battle of attrition. That being said, kids love iOS devices, and if you don’t believe me, put an iPad  in front of a toddler for 15 minutes and then try to take it away. It’s not pretty.

Remember how long it took for you to learn how to use your first computer, and the commands that went along with DOS? That barrier is gone, and kids seem to have a knack for picking up an iOS device and automatically knowing how to use it by default.

Some Neilsen findings also support the claim that kids are looking to score an iOS device for the holidays. Kids between the ages of 6 and 12 have a serious craving for iOS devices. Nielsen found that 31 percent of children want an iPad, 29 percent want an iPod touch, and 20 percent want an iPhone. That’s three Apple products in the top ten, with the iPad topping the list.

So while Windows Phone 7 is relatively new to the market compared to the iPhone and iPad, children and teens hold the keys to a product’s success. When you were a kid, who made the decisions about technology? Was it the parents begging for an NES or was it the kids pleading for a Mario appearance in the home? In my house, it was the kids, and being the oldest of the bunch, it was me.  If Microsoft wants to change their place in the smartphone sector and find themselves endeared to the younger generation again, they need to start catering to their needs, or applications like Toddler Flash cards will continue to sell better on the iPad.

Article Via TechCrunch
Photo Credit: App on My I

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