I’m not sure what people expected when they signed a two or three year contract with a telco for a brand new iPhone. Did you expect them to bend over every time a new device drops so that you can get the latest and greatest in technology? I sure as hell didn’t. I signed a three-year contract for my iPhone 3G knowing full well that I’ll be stuck with it for three years. I accepted their terms and conditions and I bought it, in full, without any reservations. Who needs a new phone every year anyway?

I don’t get the freakfest that’s going on right now around the internet. You SIGNED A CONTRACT. I’m not in favor of having to sign a contract for a cellphone, but I knew what I was getting into, and I knew full well that there will be a new iPhone every single year. If you couldn’t deduce that trend based on iPod release schedules, I feel sorry for you.

I don’t get the entitlement people feel with technology. Why should you have the right to get a new device, when you signed a contract for a previous generation item? No company in the world will let you get away with that, no matter what industry they’re in. Why should cellphone companies be any different? This is also the primary reason I’m against leasing anything, or better yet, signing a contract for a computer.

Flip the contract concept on its head for a second, please!

It would be a whole different story if you were the one having a contract altered wouldn’t it? I mean, how would you feel if the contract you’ve signed with your employer gets axed because there’s a newer, better you, sitting in the recruitment office? Something tells me you wouldn’t stand for that would you.

Quid Pro Quo. You can’t have it both ways. Either a contract is binding, or it isn’t. I’ll prefer them to remain binding.

Next time you have to sign a contract take a minute and think about the implications. Stop being blinded by the shiny object being waved in your face, and decide if you really want to be tied into a particular model of a phone for three years. If not, take your ball and go home. It’s called purchase power, and until everyone realizes that the best way to get things changed is to stop giving into companies ludicrous policies and avoid them all together… nothing is going to change.

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